Skip to main content

About your Search

20121202
20121210
SHOW
Book TV 11
STATION
CSPAN2 11
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 7:00pm EST
've been a fish or a bird or a game species of some kind or a forest. when we think about the environment and our place and i come the species of concern became us. what we do to the environment and what we do to ourselves in the process. so i think when i looked back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the national world. michael rachel carson fault line come a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in conservation movement, which i'll talk about in a moment and was really an affect the founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to actually point to a specific moment in time when that happened, when we began to think differently about the environment and our relation to it. it came in the late summer of 1962 about a month before rachel "silent spring" is an unpublished. in june of 1962 come at the yorker published three long excerpts. through the course of the summary huge controversy flared up around the book and people began to take sides on it and people beg
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 5:15pm EST
a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty"? >> i would've changed quite a lot. there's all kinds of details that a changed. but i found that to try to change one thing would be to change everything. so you know, you get into the morass of editorial work. so instead of changing an essentially retained the old look and added 40,000 new words at the beginning and kind and revision of my monetary policy in the middle. it's a new book, but it contains the old book veered >> pennysaver bishop monetary policy, what do you mean by that? >> i failed to make clear in the original version of "wealth and poverty" that i believe can stable currencies. i don't believe including current these. i agree with steve forbes that flow currencies, which is the standard value by which every entrepreneur has to
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 2:00pm EST
and in the environment grow more numerous and more fearsome. in response, progressives of all stripes coalesce, find their voice and their strength and pioneer the development of a powerful set of new ideas and policy proposals confirming that the path to a better world does, indeed, exist. demonstrations and protests multiply, and a popular movement for pro-democracy reform and transformative change is born. at the local level, people in groups plant the seeds of change through a host of innovative initiatives that provide inspirational models of how things might work in a new political economy devoted to sustaining human and natural communities. and sensing the direction in which things are moving, our wiser and more responsible leaders rise to the occasion, support the growing movement for change and frame a compelling story or narrative that makes sense of it all and provides a positive vision of a better america. the movement broadens to become a major national force. we don't know exactly how these or other forces will emerge or interact, but we do know this: that pleas for immediate action, f
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 3:45pm EST
? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government battles too much in the economy, its policies are driven by politics and markets are driven by individuals and the real world music people. that's the difference between what government does about markets do. you need government to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers the government can protect us from them. overly meddlesome government goes to fire and you end up suppressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout. are you supportive of that government intervention? >> release the question and answer of the book basically. you can see that as an emergency intervention. this government had done it back now, that would've been fine. unfortunately they stayed too long. the comparison they make is to katrina. there's emergency aid and basically people get up and back on their feet. but unfortunately the government conceded the financial crisis as a
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 9:30pm EST
something we can do about. it's how the thing we're doing to the environment are making these things more unbearable. for example, construction, you know, soon after the earthquake in haiti thereu was an earthqua in chile that killed on slightly same level or killed less than 100 people.at and ours ended up killing so many people. we are a city of badly constructed buildings and all of the things. people had been forced to leave the country side to come to the city to work. you had the den population.oce we often discuss these things and how the environment, howse erosion, how the land, how the fact that we have to burn ourn i trees forn charcoal causes us have the massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goest through. so these things, too, i thinka more of the things question do something about as a community. we that -- the other theory are also -- [inaudible] talked about.t >> in reading through "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" i was struck by the fact that so manyb writers yearn in a sense to return to haiti. >> i think so many
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 9:00pm EST
the environment in which people could explore literature especially. i think that there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite rich, and we are in the feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation is the write's institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers formed sort of an -- toward colombia where a lot of new york city writers have weekend holmes all the way up to saratoga and beyond. we have places like the writers' colony there. the writers' groups in hudson, new york. east to west and western massachusetts, and west to syracuse. that's the audience sort of circumference that we work with. so when you go back, and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connections to henry james and irwin or even bread heart, a story writer, or just, you know, a little bit further east over to emily dickinson or a little bit further south to say hi to the friend walt witman or edith gourdman. when you have the sense of the cultural heritage,
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 10:00pm EST
on batteries. and that is money. this is better you and the environment. is not only better for mother earth but it saves money and last longer. shipping! flexpay in price only good for my show. we have 3000 of them. how quickly can you call? lori leland (...) >>guest: we sold out of the point and shoot oylmpus serveearlier so now we brought back the slr style, your favor. this is a great zoom to get you closer than ever before in the palm of your hand. this is 14 oz yet you get all the bells and whistles. a stunning 3 in. screen. one of olympus up. ' is the one-touch button 720 p hi-def video right here. shannon mentioned the beauty-mode and fix. i love the grip because you feel so stable and steady. when we start talking about 36 times optical-zoom we are going to get you closer than you thought you could ever get for this price point. friend is out here doing the paddle boarding. re all the way in at full 36 times. --getting closer. i could see the water bottle on the tip of the board. about with this ground- breaking lens your mind will be blown. these are the pictures we have become
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 1:30pm EST
all loss and enhanced that. on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite ridge. we are any feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writers institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, in columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond, the writers colony -- the writers' groups in hudson, n.y. east and west into western massachusetts, west to syracuse. that is the audience, sort of circumference we work with so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connection to henry james and herman melville or bret harte or a little bit further east, emily dickinson or further south, say hi to our old friend walt whitman or edith wharton, when we have this sense of cultural heritage, it helps to amplify the writer's own sense of being part of a
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)